Years ago there was a Bible study entitled, “Experiencing God” by Henry Blackaby where he indicated that a disciple of the Lord is not easily offended.

When you examine the lives of authentic Christians who have walked with the Lord for many years, they literally seem Christ-like.  They are easy-going, kind, thoughtful, servant-like, and not easily offended.  Dallas Willard, Billy Graham, Henry Blackaby, Tim Clinton and so many more are examples of mature Christians.

Mature Christians may have a sense of righteous indignation from time to time when they see a wrong and sinful action committed.  But righteous indignation is not the same as being easily offended.

When Jesus was dying on the cross for our sins, he looked out and saw the crowd and said, “Father, forgive them. They know not what they do.”  Jesus was not screaming at the crowd, nor did He rebuke them or attack them with legions of angels.  No!  He obeyed His Father’s will meekly.  (The true definition of “meek or meekness” is not wimpy, whinny, or weak.  In the Greek, the picture of meekness is that of a warhorse that is at the ready under the control of his rider.  A warhorse is able to take out, run down two opponents while the rider/warrior confronts his enemy with various weapons.  A warhorse is a powerful military weapon, but he will not move until his master/rider commands him to advance.

Therefore, meekness is power under control.  It is like a velvet covered brick.  It is soft and easy to the touch, yet it is able to do great harm when aimed at something.

Are you easily offended?

Do you understand that your response to whatever is going on in your life is up to you.  No one can hurt you unless you cooperate with them.  Someone could call you “fatty, fatty, two by four; can’t get through the bathroom door.”  You could respond many ways.

You could laugh, cry, feel puzzled, or walk away from the person who was being unkind. Most people think that the ONLY option would be to cry or feel ashamed.  But that it not true.  How one responds speaks volumes about their maturity.

A disciple of the Lord is not easily offended.

Bless you all,

Murphy